Ludlow Massacre 100th Anniversary

Ludlow Massacre 100th Anniversary

April 20, 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the Ludlow Massacre, part of the Colorado Coalfield War of 1913-4. Striking miners and their families were living in a tent city encampment during the strikes.  The clash on April 20th resulted in almost 2 dozen deaths of those living in the camps, including many women and children.

For an overview of the Ludlow Massacre please visit:

Colorado Coal Field War Project

Ludlow Massacre occurred in Colorado 100 years ago
The Archive 0 The Denver Post
4/9/2014

Ludlow Massacre Still Matters
The New Yorker
April 19, 2014

To find more articles about the Ludlow Massacre in the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection, try these tips:
- Use words like "ludlow" "militia" "strike" as some of your search words
- Use the Select Time Period function to limit your search to the appropriate years

Worst Labor Battle in Western History Raging New Ludlow
Daily Journal
April 21, 1914

An Extraordinary Session of the State Legislature
Aspen Democrat-Times
April 21, 1914

Warring Factions at Ludlow Rest On Arms -- Strike Breaks Out at Deluga
Daily Journal
April 22, 1914

Thirty-Three Dead at Ludlow
Wray Rattler
April 23, 1914

13 Killed in Ludlow Battle
Colorado Transcript
April 23, 1914


Strikers Beyond Control; Engaged in War to Death

Aspen Democrat-Times
April 23, 1914

Special Session Legislature to be Called Tomorrow
Daily Journal
April 23, 1914

Thirty-Three Known Dead in Fight at Ludlow; Scores Are Missing
Fort Collins Weekly Courier
April 24, 1914

Gov. Ammons Hastens Home from Washington - May Call Extra Session of Legislature
Fort Collins Weekly Courier
April 24, 1914

Ammons Asks President Wilson to Send U. S. Troops to Colorado
Daily Journal
April 25, 1914


Denver. - Governor Ammons

San Juan Prospector
April 25, 1914

Second Strike Battle Rages
Range Ledger
April 25, 1914

[Article Image]

13 Killed in Ludlow Battle

Bayfield Blade
April 24, 1914

Posted by Mary on Apr. 20, 2014

Comments

My Nana, Rose Mary Louise Calentino (married into the Comi family,) lived in Calabria, Italy.  Her mother brought her (age 7) and her sister, Elsie (I think she was a year older) and brother (baby,) James, by herself across the Atlantic, entering the U.S. through Ellis Island. Nana always told a story about how her dolly got stuck in the slats on the side of the bottom of the ship and she had to leave it there.  She would break down about that even as a very old woman. 

 

They spent two years traversing the country to find my Nana’s father, Theodore Calentino, who was working the mines at Ludlow. We have no stories of the two year journey, so the story picks up when they found Theodore Calentino on April 19th, the day before the massacre.  My great-grandmother, Rose Marie Calentino (Alessi,) kicked out the mistress who was in the tent and began to set things right for her family. 

 

The next day, the shooting and fires began and Louise, Elsa and James all had to hide in the cellar in the floor of the tent.  My Nana described this as a very frightening experience and would get teary when talking about it, even when she was 100 years old!  They were saved from the cellar and taken to the train, and thank God! 

 

Our family has roots all over Trinidad, Walsenburg, Ludlow, Aguilar and Pueblo.  We have many fun and somewhat off color stories!  Our relatives owned the Comi Mortuary in Trinidad.  My father’s brother, Steve Comi (my Nana’s oldest child) was a beloved music teacher in Pueblo for many, many years.  The Calentino/Calentine/Calentini (seems like each family unit used a different version of the name) side of the family kind of scattered.  My Nanty, Elsie (Elsa,), lived in Pueblo and raised her family there – the Frazier’s.  My Nana’s half-brother (Theo Calentino) still lives in the area.  My father, Theodore Comi, now lives in Spokane, Washington.

Rebecca Steenburg (Comi)

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